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Black Lemurs, Madagascar 1997

All images are the property of Rhett Butler, copyright 2002.
Contact me regarding use and reproduction.

Black lemurs on Nosy Komba, a small island of northern Madagascar. The island has been completely stripped of all natural forest so today resident black lemurs live in plantations, secondary forest, and villages. These lemurs rely on what they can scavenge around villages and food provided by villagers and tourists.

Learn more about Madagascar: Environmental profile, Lemurs, Lac Alaotra

BLACK LEMURS, Nosy Komba

Female, male

Female

Brown lemur (Berenty)

Female

Female

Female

Female

Female

Female

Male

Male

Black lemurs in village

Brown lemur

Brown lemur

Brown lemur

Brown lemur

Male black lemur

Male black lemur



Ringtail Lemurs | Black Lemurs | Sifakas | Indris | Ruffed Lemurs
Frogs | Geckos | Insects | People & Landscapes | Vegetation

Back to Travel | mongabay.com | A Place Out of Time | Animals

Madagascar, due to its isolation from the rest of the world, has tremendous biodiversity and high rates of endemic species: of over 200,000 known species found on Madagascar, about 150,000 exist nowhere else. Unique to the island are 32 species of lemurs [pictures] (there were once 48), 168 out of 170 species of frogs [pictures], and 33 species of tenrec, miniature hedgehog-like animals. However, it is one of the most threatened ecosystems on the planet. More than 80% of the forests are gone, half of them since the late 1950's, along with numerous unique species. The forests are disappearing primarily as a result of slash-and-burn agriculture ("tavy") for rice and cattle which form the backbone of the Malagasy economy. Each year, 772 square miles (2000 sq. km) are lost, a staggering amount considering the remaining forests (rainforest loss is estimated at 1.5% per year). The agricultural livelihood of the impoverished Malagasy people is further endangered by massive soil erosion which exceeds 400 tons of topsoil per hectare in some areas. continued


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