VENEZUELA: Angel Falls | Tepuis | Tepui Summit | Water | Fauna | Flora

Venezuela Pictures

During the summer of 1996 I went trekking on and around Auyentepui in Venezuela.



SECTIONS:

Angel Falls

Flora

Fauna

Tepui Summit

Rivers & Creeks

Tepui & Scenery


HIGHLIGHTS:

Tabletop mountains (called tepui) as seen from the Rio Carrao
Tabletop mountains (called tepui) as seen from the Rio Carrao


Angel falls seen from an airplane
Angel falls seen from an airplane


Angel falls, the world's tallest waterfall, seen from an airplane
Angel falls, the world's tallest waterfall, seen from an airplane


Edge of an area deforested long ago by miners in Venezuela
Edge of an area deforested long ago by miners in Venezuela


Coloful bromeliad in southern Venezuela
Coloful bromeliad in southern Venezuela


Tank bromeliad in southern Venezuela
Tank bromeliad in southern Venezuela


Garden of bromeliads on the approach to the tepui summit
Garden of bromeliads on the approach to the tepui summit


Epiphyte garden near to the summit of Auyantepui
Epiphyte garden near to the summit of Auyantepui


Pemón guide in an epiphyte garden near the summit of Auyantepui
Pemón guide in an epiphyte garden near the summit of Auyantepui


Yellow-banded Poison Arrow Frog (Dendrobates leucomelas) in Venezuela
Yellow-banded Poison Arrow Frog (Dendrobates leucomelas) in Venezuela


Angel falls, the world's highest waterfall
Angel falls, the world's highest waterfall


Yellow, black, orange, and white grasshopper in Venezuela
Yellow, black, orange, and white grasshopper in Venezuela


Heliconius butterfly on a hotlips flower
Heliconius butterfly on a hotlips flower


Tarantula in Venezuela
Tarantula in Venezuela


Fisherman with a catfish from the Rio Carrao
Fisherman with a catfish from the Rio Carrao


Emergent canopy tree with a tepui in the background
Emergent canopy tree with a tepui in the background


Former village site along the Carrao river in Venezuela
Former village site along the Carrao river in Venezuela


Pink sandstone of Auyantepui
Pink sandstone of Auyantepui


Tepui in Venzuela, seen from the Carrao river
Tepui in Venzuela, seen from the Carrao river


Auyantepui as seen from the Rio Carrao
Auyantepui as seen from the Rio Carrao


Angel falls, the world's tallest waterfall, located in Venezuela
Angel falls, the world's tallest waterfall, located in Venezuela


Summit of Auyantepui, Devil's mountain, Venezuela
Summit of Auyantepui, Devil's mountain, Venezuela


Wei tepui in Venezuela
Wei tepui in Venezuela


Devil's mountain (Auyan tepui) waterfall
Devil's mountain (Auyan tepui) waterfall


Internal waterfall on the summit of Auyantepui
Internal waterfall on the summit of Auyantepui


Crevasse on Devil's mountain
Crevasse on Devil's mountain


Blackwater creek on the trail to the Auyantepui summit
Blackwater creek on the trail to the Auyantepui summit


View up at the rainforest canopy in the Venezuelan Amazon
View up at the rainforest canopy in the Venezuelan Amazon


Angel falls as seen from its base
Angel falls as seen from its base





Recommended travel guides on Venezuela:



Venezuela -- from Wikipedia

Venezuela is home to a wide variety of landscapes, such as the northeasternmost extensions of the Andes mountains in the northwest and along the northern Caribbean coast, of which the highest point is the Pico Bolívar at 5,007 m.

Also found in the northwest are the lowlands around Lake Maracaibo and the Gulf of Venezuela. The centre of the country is characterised by extensive plains known as the llanos that stretch from the Colombian border to the river delta of the Orinoco east. To the south are found the dissected Guiana Highlands, home to Angel Falls, the world's highest waterfall.

The local climate is tropical and generally hot and humid, though more moderate in the highlands. The capital, Caracas is also the country's largest city. Other major cities include Maracaibo, Barquisimeto, Valencia, Maracay, and Ciudad Guayana. (more) History

Venezuela was the site of one of the first permanent Spanish settlements in South America in 1522, and most of the territory eventually became part of the viceroyalty of New Granada. Parts of what is now eastern Venezuela became New Andalusia. After several unsuccessful uprisings, the country declared independence from Spain in 1811 under the leadership of its most famous son, Simón Bolívar.The revolutionary war was decided, however, in the famous battle of Carabobo in June 24th 1821, led against Bolívar's orders by "Grand Marshall" (Gran Mariscal de Ayacucho) Antonio José de Sucre, when the revolutionaries beat the Spaniards. Simon Bolivar led the armies of Venezuela and other countries to free and found what are now Colombia, Panama, Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia. Another important revolutionary leader during the war was the aforementioned Antonio José de Sucre, who won many battles for Bolivar and was a candidate to become his natural succesor until he was murdered. Venezuela became, after the revolutionary war, along with Colombia and Ecuador part of the Republic of Gran Colombia (República de Gran Colombia) until 1830, when the country separated and became a sovereign republic.

Much of Venezuela's 19th and early 20th century history was characterized by political instability, political struggle, and dictatorial rule. Following the death of Juan Vicente Gómez in 1935 and the demise of caudillismo (authoritarian oligarchical rule), democratic struggles eventually forced the military to withdraw from direct involvement in national politics in 1958. Since that year, Venezuela has enjoyed an unbroken tradition of democratic civilian rule, though not without conflict.

In 1992, there was an attempt by rebellious entities within the Venezuelan military, led by Lieutenant Hugo Chávez, to remove two-time democratically elected president Carlos Andrés Pérez from power. The coup ultimately failed, and Chávez and his co-conspirators were jailed for treason. Pérez, on the other hand, was eventually impeached and convicted for corruption. The coup brought about the death of 80 civilians and 17 members of the armed forces. Chávez's role in resisting a president generally perceived as corrupt by the lower classes made him a prominent figure among them. Chávez was eventually released from jail in 1994 by Perez's elected successor, Rafael Caldera.

Chávez was elected president in 1998 with 56% of the vote as part of a new political party, the Movement for the Fifth Republic. His platform ("Bolivarian revolution") called for the signing of a new constitution, which was written by a Constituent Assembly and approved by referendum in 1999. Chávez was re-elected in 2000 under the new constitution with 59% of the vote. In November 2000, the National Assembly granted Chávez the right to rule by decree for one year, and in November 2001, Chávez made a set of 49 decrees, including large reforms in oil and agrarian policy. The Chávez presidency has for the first time given the majority of Venezuelans a share in the national wealth.

Chavez controls all branches of the government since his party has a majority in the National Assembly, and he has hand picked the judges of the Supreme Tribunal.

In December 2001, the nation's largest business organizations and the petroleum workers' union organized a general strike. In 2002, the US-backed opposition staged an unsuccessful coup and briefly installed Pedro Carmona Estanga as president of Venezuela. Due to a subsequent, popular uprising, with support from the rank and file members of the military, Pedro Carmona was forced to resign. Diosdado Cabello, Vice President of Venezuela, became president as dictated by the constitution. Chávez was restored to the Presidency in 48 hours. A recall referendum was held on August 15, 2004, which Chávez won with approximately 58% of the vote. Leaders and supporters of the opposition accused Chavez of rigging the election, but failed to prove the accusation. The opposition claims were later silenced when the Organization of American States and the Carter Center certified the referendum. In 2004 plans for another coup were allegedly foiled.

Since then, Chávez's popularity in Venezuela and throughout Latin America, where two-thirds of the South American continent have elected pro-people presidencies, has grown. As oil prices have soared in the wake of the second Iraqi war and booming Chinese demand, oil-rich Venezuela has had the opportunity to refuse loans and aid from the US.

The Bush Administration's influence in Caracas has plummeted, as president Hugo Chávez accuses the Bush administration of supporting the failed 2002 Venezuelan coup. Chávez's program has sought to decrease dependency on Washington and to diversify diplomatic and economic ties with governments throughout the world, such as Cuba, Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay, among many other Latin American countries, as well as China, Iran and India. His government has also consistently pursued closer ties to other countries opposed to global control by the US corporate state.

Articles involving conservation and the environment in Venezuela:

Venezuela News | Mongabay Environmental News

Venezuela News

For many years, study skins of a bird languished in a dusty drawer in the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of Natural History, classified hurriedly (and erroneously,) as Scytalopus atratus nigricans, a songbird found in lower montane ...

Over 62 million hectares (240,000 square miles) of forest across Latin America — an area roughly the size of Texas or ...

Nearly two-thirds of the Amazon rainforest is located in Brazil, making it the biggest component in the region's deforestation rate. Helpfully, ...

Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos has announced plans to create the world’s largest protected area, stretching from the Atlantic Ocean to ...

Loss of tropical forests accelerated roughly 60 percent during the 2000s, argues a paper published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters. ...

Gold mining is on the rise in the Guiana Shield, a geographic region of South America that holds one of the ...

Scientists have long believed that gene flow and species dispersal is only interrupted by physical barriers, like mountain ranges, rivers or ...

You may have recently read the controversial story on invasive lionfish research involving Dr. Zack Jud of Florida International University and ...

There's nothing in the world like a primary forest, which has never been industrially logged or cleared by humans. They are ...

Regnskogfondet (the Rainforest Foundation of Norway) recently released a 52-page report that gives an in-depth account of the conflicts activists and ...

The leatherback sea turtle—the world's largest turtle and the only member of the genus Dermochelys—received good news today. In an update ...

In a dramatic response to global warming, tropical forests in the high elevation areas of five continents have been "browning" since ...

Want to save the world's biodiversity from mass extinction? Then make certain to safeguard the 74 sites identified today in a ...

In 2011, the top 11 richest carbon emitters spent an estimated $74 billion on fossil fuel subsidies, or seven times the ...

Deforestation has sharply increased in Amazon countries outside of Brazil, finds a new analysis based on satellite data. Using data from ...

One-hundred-and-ninety-seven illegal loggers across a dozen Central and South American countries have been arrested during INTERPOL's first strike against widespread forestry ...

The average annual rate of deforestation across Amazon rainforest countries dropped sharply in the second half of the 2000s, reports a ...

An update to one of the most comprehensive maps of the Amazon basin shows that forest cover across the world's largest ...

Up to 80 people have been massacred by gold miners in the remote Venezuelan Amazon, according to reports received by the ...

A white moth from Venezuela that bears a striking resemblance to a poodle has become an Internet sensation, after cryptozoologist Karl ...
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Copyright Rhett Butler 1994-2012

Pictures were taken by Rhett A. Butler, copyright 2008. While these photos are the property of mongabay.com, it may be permissible to use them for non-commercial purposes (like powerpoint presentations and school projects), provided that the images are not altered in any form. Please read this for more details. If you are interested in using an image in a publication please contact me.


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