Suriname: Slideshow | Wildlife | Scenery

Photos of Suriname [updated 06.25.2008]


All images are the property of Rhett A. Butler / mongabay.com, copyright 2008. contact me regarding use and reproduction.


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Sections

Aerial, Agriculture, Amphibians, Animals, Birds, Brownsberg Nature Park, Deforestation, Flora, Frogs, Gold Mining, Herps, Indigenous Villages, Invertebrates, Kwamalasamutu, Mammals, Mining, Primates, Rainforest, Rainforest Agriculture, Reptiles, Rivers, Scenery, Sipaliwini District (Suriname Interior), Subsistence Agriculture, Villages, and Wildlife.

Highlights

Waterfall
Waterfall


Gray-winged Trumpeters (Psophia crepitans)
Gray-winged Trumpeters (Psophia crepitans)


Insect
Insect


Orange and black insect
Orange and black insect


Red-orange beetle
Red-orange beetle


Leaf toad (Bufo species?)
Leaf toad (Bufo species?)


Leaf-mimicking praying mantis
Leaf-mimicking praying mantis


Magenta insect with light blue feet and eyes
Magenta insect with light blue feet and eyes


Forest of Brownsberg
Forest of Brownsberg


Brocholi-like rainforest canopy
Brocholi-like rainforest canopy


Brown-orange mushroom
Brown-orange mushroom


Black-headed parrot (Pionites melanocephala)
Black-headed parrot (Pionites melanocephala)


Hot pink insect with turquoise feet and eyes
Hot pink insect with turquoise feet and eyes


Rainforest ant
Rainforest ant


Cane toad (Bufo marinus)
Cane toad (Bufo marinus)


Gecko on a papaya
Gecko on a papaya


Turnip-tailed Gecko (Thecadactylus rapicauda)
Turnip-tailed Gecko (Thecadactylus rapicauda)


Red howler monkey
Red howler monkey


Bees pollinating a pink and yellow flower
Bees pollinating a pink and yellow flower


Three-striped posion arrow frog (Epipedobates trivittatus) with tadpoles on its back
Three-striped posion arrow frog (Epipedobates trivittatus) with tadpoles on its back


Yellow and blue poison arrow frog climbing a tree trunk
Yellow and blue poison arrow frog climbing a tree trunk


Kurere ehtephe rapids
Kurere ehtephe rapids


Turquoise insect with orange legs
Turquoise insect with orange legs


Red ginger
Red ginger


Pebas stubfoot toad
Pebas stubfoot toad


Hot pink and turquoise insect
Hot pink and turquoise insect


Ant
Ant


Leaf toad (Bufo species?)
Leaf toad (Bufo species?)


Posion dart frog
Posion dart frog


Red-headed spider with yellow and black markings
Red-headed spider with yellow and black markings


Termites
Termites


Giant walking stick
Giant walking stick


Buterfly with eye-spots
Buterfly with eye-spots


Wasps clustered on a leaf
Wasps clustered on a leaf


Passion vine blossom
Passion vine blossom


Maroon flowers with light blue berries
Maroon flowers with light blue berries


Indigenous park guard on forest patrol
Indigenous park guard on forest patrol


Rainforest sunset
Rainforest sunset


Rainforest sunset
Rainforest sunset


Rainforest sunset
Rainforest sunset


Rainforest creek
Rainforest creek


Tropical Kingbirds in flight
Tropical Kingbirds in flight


Cane toad (Bufo marinus)
Cane toad (Bufo marinus)


Leaf-mimicking praying mantis
Leaf-mimicking praying mantis


Leaf-mimicking praying mantis
Leaf-mimicking praying mantis


Yellow and blue poison arrow frog guarding its nest
Yellow and blue poison arrow frog guarding its nest


Shifting cultivation by the Trio tribe in the rainforest of Southern Suriname
Shifting cultivation by the Trio tribe in the rainforest of Southern Suriname


Baby three-toed sloth hugging a stuffed panda in a Trio indigenous community
Baby three-toed sloth hugging a stuffed panda in a Trio indigenous community


Leaf-mimicking insect
Leaf-mimicking insect


Orange flowers
Orange flowers


Red heliconia
Red heliconia


Red beetle
Red beetle


Dung beetle
Dung beetle


Butterfly
Butterfly


Orange, yellow, and black butterfly
Orange, yellow, and black butterfly


Capuchin monkey
Capuchin monkey


Giant dragonfly
Giant dragonfly


Yellow and blue poison arrow frog
Yellow and blue poison arrow frog


Green garden lizard (Ameiva ameiva)
Green garden lizard (Ameiva ameiva)


Cobalt Blue Tarantula
Cobalt Blue Tarantula


Aerial view of a tailing pond for the Suraco bauxite mine
Aerial view of a tailing pond for the Suraco bauxite mine


Blue-eyed butterfly
Blue-eyed butterfly


Rust-colored moth with yellow and red markings and a black fringe
Rust-colored moth with yellow and red markings and a black fringe




Recent news articles on Suriname

Markets could save rainforests: an interview with Andrew Mitchell
(8/17/2008) Markets may soon value rainforests as living entities rather than for just the commodities produced when they are cut down, said a tropical forest researcher speaking in June at a conservation biology conference in the South American country of Suriname. Andrew Mitchell, founder and director of the London-based Global Canopy Program (GCP), said he is encouraged by signs that investors are beginning to look at the value of services afforded by healthy forests.

High mineral prices drive rainforest destruction
(8/13/2008) The surging price of minerals is contributing to degradation and destruction of rainforests worldwide, warns a researcher writing in the current issue of New Scientist.

Account of 18th century Amazon adventurer to be published for the first time
(8/11/2008) After establishing his ingenious classification system in 1735, Carl Linnaeus, the greatest naturalist of his era, sent young and eager followers to all parts of the world to help him in the goal of collecting and cataloguing the world's species. It was a project unlike any before; Swedish naturalists, often referred to as Linnaeus's apostles, roamed as far as Japan, South America, Australia, and the Arctic with the same goal in mind—describing species according to Linnaeus's system.

Often overlooked, small wild cats are important and in trouble
(8/5/2008) While often over-shadowed by their larger and better-known relatives like lions, tigers, leopards, and jaguars, small cats are important indicators of the health of an ecosystem, says a leading small cat expert who uses camera traps extensively to document and monitor mammals in the wild. Dr Jim Sanderson, a scientist with the Small Cat Conservation Alliance and Conservation International, is working to save some of the world's rarest cats, including the Andean cat and Guigna of South America and the bay, flat-headed, and marbled cats of Southeast Asia. In the process Sanderson has captured on film some of the planet's least seen animals, including some species that have never before been photographed. He has also found that despite widespread criticism, some corporate entities are effectively protecting remote wilderness areas.

An interview a shaman in the Amazon rainforest
(7/28/2008) Deep in the Suriname rainforest, an innovative conservation group is working with indigenous tribes to protect their forest home and culture using traditional knowledge combined with cutting-edge technology. The Amazon Conservation Team (ACT) is partnering with the Trio, an Amerindian group that lives in the remote Suriname-Brazil border area of South America, to develop programs to protect their forest home from illegal gold miners and encroachment, improve village health, and strengthen cultural ties between indigenous youths and elders at a time when such cultures are disappearing even faster than rainforests. In June 2008 mongabay.com visited the community of Kwamalasamutu in Suriname to see ACT's programs in action. During the visit, Amasina, a Trio shaman who works with ACT, answered some questions about his role as a traditional healer in the village.

Volunteering with Leatherback Sea Turtles in Galibi, Suriname
(7/8/2008) The northern coast of Suriname is one of the best places in the world to view the largest turtle, the marine Leatherback. Watching the turtle rise out of the tides onto the beach gives one the sense of meeting something ancient, rare, and more sea-monster than marine turtle. Yet, if I call it a sea-monster, I do not mean that it is frightening or ugly: far from it. But it is mysterious, terrible, and wondrous.

Scientists call for mining ban, new protected areas in Suriname
(6/20/2008) In a resolution set forth at their annual meeting in Paramaribo, Suriname, the largest group of tropical biologists called upon the Surinamese government to evict informal gold miners from three ecologically important areas in the South American country. Miners have been blamed for a number of environmental problems including over-hunting of wildlife, deforestation and destruction of riparian habitats, erosion, and mercury pollution in waterways.

Geology, climate links make Guiana Shield region particularly sensitive to change
(6/14/2008) Soil and climate patterns in the Guiana Shield make the region particularly sensitive to environmental change, said a scientist speaking at a biology conference in Paramaribo, Suriname.

Guiana Shield forests help preserve biodiversity and climate
(6/9/2008) The Guiana Shield region of South America could play a significant role in efforts to fight global warming as part of a broader strategy to protect the world's biodiversity hotspots and high biodiversty wilderness areas, said a leading conservationist speaking in Paramaribo, Suriname at a gathering of tropical biologists.

Rare golden primates help speed recovery of endangered Brazilian forest
(6/9/2008) The endangered golden lion tamarin — a flagship species for conservation efforts in Brazil's highly threatened Atlantic Forest or Mata Atlantica — plays an important role in seed dispersal, thereby helping forest regeneration, according to research published in the June issue of the open access e-journal Tropical conservation Science.

Amazon rainforest children to get medicinal plant training from shamans
(11/21/2007) The Amazon conservation Team (ACT) -- a group using innovative approaches to preserving culture and improving health among Amazonian rainforest tribes -- has been awarded a $100,000 grant from Nature's Path, an organic cereal manufacturer. The funds will allow ACT to address one of the most pressing social concerns for Amazon forest dwellers by expanding its educational and cultural "Shamans and Apprentice" program for indigenous children in the region.

Amphibian extinction may be worse than thought
(10/31/2007) Amphibian extinction rates may be higher than previously thought, according to new DNA analysis that found more than 60 unrecognized species in the Guiana Shield of South America.

conservationists need to work with, not against, rural poor
(10/24/2007) Rural populations have long been demonized by conservationists, but this is changing. Increasingly, conservation groups see that without the support of rural populations, protected areas can in places be little more than ineffective "paper parks". As such, today community involvement is viewed as a critical part of any conservation program, whether it be protecting biodiversity, slowing deforestation, curtailing illegal logging and poaching, or establishing reserves.

Low deforestation countries to see least benefit from carbon trading
(8/13/2007) Countries that have done the best job protecting their tropical forests stand to gain the least from proposed incentives to combat global warming through carbon offsets, warns a new study published in Tuesday in the journal Public Library of Science Biology (PLoS). The authors say that "high forest cover with low rates of deforestation" (HFLD) nations "could become the most vulnerable targets for deforestation if the Kyoto Protocol and upcoming negotiations on carbon trading fail to include intact standing forest."

Mining gets approval despite recent species discoveries
(6/13/2007) Suriname will allow mining in a highly biodiverse tract of forest where 24 previously unknown species were recently discovered. The decision had been expected.

Pictures of newly discovered species in Suriname
(6/4/2007) Scientists documented 467 species, including 24 species believed new to science, during a rainforest survey in eastern Suriname, South America. The expedition, led by conservation International (CI), was sponsored by two mining companies, BHP-Billiton Maatschappij Suriname (BMS) and Suriname Aluminium Company LLC (Suralco), hoping to mine the area for bauxite, the raw material used to make aluminum. conservation International said the Rapid Assessment Survey (RAP) will help "give miners guidance on protecting unique plants and animals during potential future development," according to a statement from the organization.

China tropical log imports jump at Jiangsu port
(5/16/2007) Logs imports through Zhangjiagang Port in Jiangsu Province, China have increased significantly in 2007, reports the International Tropical Timber Organization (ITTO) in its bi-weekly update.

Time is running out for French Guiana's rainforests
(12/19/2006) Understanding relationships between plants and animals is key to understanding rainforest ecology. Dr. Pierre-Michel Forget of the Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle in France is a renowned expert on the interdependency between rainforest trees and seed disperses. Author of dozens of papers on tropical forest ecology, Dr Forget is increasingly concerned about deforestation and biodiversity loss in forests of the Guiana Shield region of Northern South America. In particular he sees the invasion of informal gold miners, known as garimpeiros, as a significant threat to forests in French Guiana, Suriname, Guyana and Venezuela.

Amazon Indians use Google Earth, GPS to protect forest home
(11/14/2006) Deep in the most remote jungles of South America, Amazon Indians are using Google Earth, Global Positioning System (GPS) mapping, and other technologies to protect their fast-dwindling home. Tribes in Suriname, Brazil, and Colombia are combining their traditional knowledge of the rainforest with Western technology to conserve forests and maintain ties to their history and cultural traditions, which include profound knowledge of the forest ecosystem and medicinal plants. Helping them is the Amazon conservation Team (ACT), a nonprofit organization working with indigenous people to conserve biodiversity, health, and culture in South American rainforests.

Carbon finance could net Guyana and Suriname tens of millions of dollars
(11/6/2006) Guyana and Suriname -- two of South America's least known countries -- could earn tens of millions of dollars through a global warming deal that may be proposed this week at U.N. climate talks between 189 countries in Nairobi, Kenya.




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