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Pictures of Peru


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Peru is one of the most biodiverse countries on the planet. It was also the center of the advanced Inca civilization which, despite its short existence, made lasting contributions in architecture, agriculture, astronomy, and political organization.

Updated Sept 2011: 2011 trip highlights




Expanded sections
Aerial Photography
Agriculture
Amazon Rainforest
Amazon Wildlife
Amphibians
Andean Cock-Of-The Rock
Andes
Arthropods
Biotopes
Birds
Butterflies and Moths
Canopy Walkways
Cloud Forests
Conservation
Creeks
Cuzco
Deforestation
Domesticated Animals
Epiphytes
Farming
Flora
Flowers
Forest Fires
Frogs and Toads
Fungi
Gold Mining
Herps
Inca Ruins
Indigenous People
Insects
Invertebrates
Kosnipata Valley
Lizards
Lodges
Macaws
Mammals
Manu National Park
Markets
Mining
Monkeys
Mountains
Mushrooms
Orchids
Parrots
People
Primates
Puerto Maldanado
Rainbows
Rainforest Animals
Rainforests
Reptiles
Rio Huaypetue Gold Mine
Rivers
Ruins
Scenery
Spiders
Squirrel Monkeys
Sunsets
Tambopata Reserve
Toads
Transoceanic Highway
Villa Carmen
Villages
Waterfalls
Wayqecha Biological Station
Wildlife


More on Peru
  • Conservation news for Peru
  • Deforestation stats for Peru
  • Rainforest report for Peru - from the late 1990s
  • Library of Congress: Peru
  • Recommended travel guides on Peru
  • Inca Society
  • The Cultivation Genius of the Inca
  • MAIN SECTIONS

    Machu Picchu
    Machu Picchu


    Machu Picchu
    Cuzco & Urubamba


    Amazon
    Amazon rainforest


    Andes
    Andes


    Red-and-green macaws
    Manu Rainforest


    Monkey frog (Phyllomedusa bicolor)
    Tambopata Rainforest


    Peru rainforest
    Iquitos Rainforest


    Wayqecha
    Wayqecha


    Gold mining
    Deforestation


    ORange ball flower
    Flora


    Dusky Titi Monkey
    Wildlife


    Aerial
    Aerial pictures




    HIGHLIGHTS

    Rainbow over the Amazon
    Rainbow over the Amazon


    Hyla tree frog species
    Hyla tree frog species
    Location: Tambopata rainforest

    (Peru)

    Chestnut Eared Aracari (Pteroglossus castanotis)
    Chestnut Eared Aracari (Pteroglossus castanotis)
    Location: Tambopata rainforest

    (Peru)

    Uppermost reaches of the Amazon basin watershed
    Uppermost reaches of the Amazon basin watershed


    Andean woman in traditional Quencha attire
    Andean woman in traditional Quencha attire
    Location: Sacred Valley of the Urubamba

    (Peru)

    Rio Pini Pini flowing out of Manu National Park
    Rio Pini Pini flowing out of Manu National Park


    Yellow and black banded caterpillar
    Yellow and black banded caterpillar


    Hyla rhodopepla tree frog on leaf
    Hyla rhodopepla tree frog on leaf
    Location: Tambopata rainforest

    (Peru)

    Amazon rainforest and Andean glaciers and peaks
    Amazon rainforest and Andean glaciers and peaks


    Yellow and red Heliconia
    Yellow and red Heliconia


    Sun setting over Amazon rainforest
    Sun setting over Amazon rainforest
    Location: Tambopata rainforest

    (Peru)

    Andean landscape with glaciers and snow-capped peak
    Andean landscape with glaciers and snow-capped peak
    Location: Sacred Valley of the Urubamba

    (Peru)

    Young girl in Willoq community wearing traditional clothing
    Young girl in Willoq community wearing traditional clothing
    Location: Willoq community in the Sacred Valley near Ollantaytambo outside of Cuzco; Peru

    (Peru)

    Smiling Willoq man in Ollantaytambo
    Smiling Willoq man in Ollantaytambo
    Location: Willoq community in the Sacred Valley near Ollantaytambo outside of Cuzco; PeruV

    (Peru)

    Cuzco countryside with view of snow-capped peaks in Peru
    Cuzco countryside with view of snow-capped peaks in Peru
    Location: UrubambaV

    (Peru)

    Monkey frog (Phyllomedusa bicolor)
    Monkey frog (Phyllomedusa bicolor)
    A large treefrog found in the rainforest of Peru
    Location: Tambopata rainforest

    (Peru)

    Sunset in the Amazon rainforest
    Sunset in the Amazon rainforest


    Insect nymph
    Insect nymph


    Blue-and-yellow macaws (Ara ararauna); Yellow-crowned parrots (Amazona ochrocephala); and Scarlet macaws feeding on clay
    Blue-and-yellow macaws (Ara ararauna); Yellow-crowned parrots (Amazona ochrocephala); and Scarlet macaws feeding on clay
    Location: Tambopata rainforest

    (Peru)

    Shadow of an airplane in the clouds over the Amazon
    Shadow of an airplane in the clouds over the Amazon


    Andean peaks and a turquoise lake
    Andean peaks and a turquoise lake


    Blue-and-yellow macaw in Peru
    Blue-and-yellow macaw in Peru


    Rainforest canopy leaves
    Rainforest canopy leaves


    Rainforest valley in the upper Amazon
    Rainforest valley in the upper Amazon


    Milky turquoise river in the Amazon basin
    Milky turquoise river in the Amazon basin


    Scarlet macaw (Ara macao) headshot
    Scarlet macaw (Ara macao) headshot
    Location: Tambopata rainforest

    (Peru)

    Aerial image of the broccoli-like structure of the Amazon rainforest canopy
    Aerial image of the broccoli-like structure of the Amazon rainforest canopy


    Overhead view of the Río Huaypetue gold mine in Peru
    Overhead view of the Río Huaypetue gold mine in Peru


    Aerial photo of an Amazon rainforest tributary
    Aerial photo of an Amazon rainforest tributary


    Orange-pink and yellow leafhopper
    Orange-pink and yellow leafhopper


    Plant with bright pink stems
    Plant with bright pink stems


    Willoq baby
    Willoq baby
    Location: Willoq community in the Sacred Valley near Ollantaytambo outside of Cuzco; Peru

    (Peru)

    Capybara leaving water with a bird on its back
    Capybara leaving water with a bird on its back
    Location: Tambopata rainforest

    (Peru)

    River valley on the Amazon side of the lower Andes
    River valley on the Amazon side of the lower Andes


    Rio Pini Pini flowing out of Manu National Park
    Rio Pini Pini flowing out of Manu National Park


    Forest along bank of Tambopata river
    Forest along bank of Tambopata river
    Location: Tambopata rainforest

    (Peru)

    Manu Cloud Forest Lodge
    Manu Cloud Forest Lodge


    Cecropia in the Peruvian cloud forest
    Cecropia in the Peruvian cloud forest


    Dry river bed in the Amazon basin
    Dry river bed in the Amazon basin


    Upper Amazon forest and the Andes
    Upper Amazon forest and the Andes


    Meneria Metalmark (Amarynthis meneria)
    Meneria Metalmark (Amarynthis meneria)


    Three-striped Poison dart frog (Epipedobates trivittatus)
    Three-striped Poison dart frog (Epipedobates trivittatus)
    Location: Tambopata rainforest

    (Peru)

    View of the Amazon rainforest down the Kosnipata Valley
    View of the Amazon rainforest down the Kosnipata Valley


    Purple flowers in forest understorey
    Purple flowers in forest understorey
    Location: Tambopata rainforest

    (Peru)

    Dry river bed in the Amazon basin
    Dry river bed in the Amazon basin


    Río Huaypetue gold mine in Peru
    Río Huaypetue gold mine in Peru


    Andean Cock-of-the-rock
    Andean Cock-of-the-rock
    Location: Machu Picchu Pueblo

    (Peru)

    Heliconia flower
    Heliconia flower
    Location: Manu National Park in the Rainforest of Peru

    (Peru)

    Mist over the Amazon rainforest at sunset
    Mist over the Amazon rainforest at sunset


    Upper Amazon cloud forest and the Andes
    Upper Amazon cloud forest and the Andes


    Hyla tree frog close up
    Hyla tree frog close up
    Location: Tambopata rainforest

    (Peru)

    Cane toad (Bufo marinus) in the wild
    Cane toad (Bufo marinus) in the wild
    Location: Tambopata rainforest

    (Peru)

    Aerial photograph of an Amazon oxbow lake
    Aerial photograph of an Amazon oxbow lake


    Highest reaches of the Amazon rainforest
    Highest reaches of the Amazon rainforest


    Bat
    Bat


    Orange and yellow ball-like flower in Peruvian rainforest
    Orange and yellow ball-like flower in Peruvian rainforest
    Location: Tambopata rainforest

    (Peru)



    Recommended travel guides on Peru:



    News on Peru

    Legal logging concessions drive illegal logging in Peru, threatening forests and indigenous people

    (04/17/2014) Nearly 70 percent of "officially inspected" logging concessions in Peru have had their permits canceled or are under investigation for major breaches of forestry laws, finds a new study published in the journal Scientific Reports. Worryingly, the research also concludes that forestry permits are being widely used to launder timber illegally logged from outside concession areas.


    Saving rainforests by buying them

    (04/04/2014) For more than twenty five years, an international non-profit known as the World Land Trust has been working to protect tropical forests through land purchase and partnerships with local groups. Last year, the U.S. arm of the group decided to rebrand itself as the Rainforest Trust to better convey its core mission to the outside world. Since then, the Rainforest Trust has launched its most ambitious project yet: conserving 5.9 million acres of tropical forest in Peru.


    Several Amazonian tree frog species discovered, where only two existed before

    (03/18/2014) We have always been intrigued by the Amazon rainforest with its abundant species richness and untraversed expanses. Despite our extended study of its wildlife, new species such as the olinguito (Bassaricyon neblina), a bear-like carnivore hiding out in the Ecuadorian rainforest, are being identified as recently as last year. In fact, the advent of efficient DNA sequencing and genomic analysis has revolutionized how we think about species diversity. Today, scientists can examine known diversity in a different way, revealing multiple 'cryptic' species that have evaded discovery by being mistakenly classified as a single species based on external appearance alone.


    Mother of God: meet the 26 year old Indiana Jones of the Amazon, Paul Rosolie

    (03/17/2014) Not yet 30, Paul Rosolie has already lived a life that most would only dare dream of—or have nightmares over, depending on one's constitution. With the Western Amazon as his panorama, Rosolie has faced off jaguars, wrestled anacondas, explored a floating forest, mentored with indigenous people, been stricken by tropical disease, traveled with poachers, and hand-reared a baby anteater. It's no wonder that at the ripe age of 26, Rosolie was already written a memoir: Mother of God.


    Photos: Weird aquatic lizard discovered in mountain streams of Peru

    (03/13/2014) A 'new' species of lizard has been described from the cloud forests of Peru's Manu National Park, reports SERNANP, the Peruvian National Park Service.


    The price of gold: winners and losers in Latin America's mining industry

    (03/05/2014) On a Friday afternoon in June, the Plaza de Armas in Cajamarca is pulsing with life. It's winter here, and although thick white clouds hover low in the distance, the sun in this northern Peruvian city is warm. Couples sit on benches facing one another. Kids run in the grass between flowerbeds. Men in suits stride along the perimeter. It's an idyllic day. But signs of something more ominous are not far from sight. On the mountainside overlooking the town the words Nova Conga have been carved into the vegetation. It is a constant reminder that beyond the square, hemmed with international hotels and expensive restaurants, there is another reality.


    The making of Amazon Gold: once more unto the breach

    (02/19/2014) When Sarah duPont first visited the Peruvian Amazon rainforest in the summer of 1999, it was a different place than it is today. Oceans of green, tranquil forest, met the eye at every turn. At dawn, her brain struggled to comprehend the onslaught of morning calls and duets of the nearly 600 species of birds resounding under the canopy. Today, the director of the new award-winning film, Amazon Gold, reports that "roads have been built and people have arrived. It has become a new wild west, a place without law. People driven by poverty and the desire for a better life have come, exploiting the sacred ground."


    Helping the Amazon's 'Jaguar People' protect their culture and traditional wisdom

    (02/11/2014) Tribes in the Amazon are increasingly exposed to the outside world by choice or circumstance. The fallout of outside contact has rarely been anything less than catastrophic, resulting in untold extinction of hundreds of tribes over the centuries. For ones that survived the devastation of introduced disease and conquest, the process of acculturation transformed once proud cultures into fragmented remnants, their self-sufficiency and social cohesion stripped away, left to struggle in a new world marked by poverty and external dependence


    Gas company to drill in Manu National Park buffer zone, imperiling indigenous people

    (02/04/2014) The Peruvian government has approved plans for gas company Pluspetrol to move deeper into a supposedly protected reserve for indigenous peoples and the buffer zone of the Manu National Park in the Amazon rainforest. The approval follows the government rescinding a highly critical report on the potential impacts of the operations by the Culture Ministry (MINCU), the resignation of the Culture Minister and other Ministry personnel, and repeated criticism from Peruvian and international civil society.


    Total says it will not drill in any World Heritage Sites

    (02/03/2014) One of the world's largest oil and gas companies, Total, has committed to leave the planet's UNESCO World Heritage Sites untouched, according to the United Nations. The UN says the French energy giant has sent written confirmation that it will not explore or extract fossil fuels from any of the world's over 200 natural World Heritage Sites.


    287 amphibian and reptile species in Peruvian park sets world record (photos)

    (01/28/2014) It's official: Manu National Park in Peru has the highest diversity of reptiles and amphibians in the world. Surveys of the park, which extends from high Andean cloud forests down into the tropical rainforest of the Western Amazon, and its buffer zone turned up 155 amphibian and 132 reptile species, 16 more than the 271 species documented in Ecuador's Yasuní National Park in 2010.


    Red toad discovered in the upper reaches of the Amazon

    (01/19/2014) Scientists have described a previously unknown species of toad in the Peruvian Andes.


    Environmental groups: top secret Pacific trade agreement to sacrifice wildlife, environment

    (01/16/2014) Environmental groups have blasted draft text of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) released yesterday by WikiLeaks as potentially devastating to the environment and wildlife. The massive 12-nation free trade agreement has been negotiated in secret now for almost four years, and the information release by WikiLeaks shows that key environmental safeguards in the agreement are being stripped away, including a ban on shark finning and illegal logging, as well as legally-enforced pollution regulations.


    Rainforest news review for 2013

    (12/26/2013) 2013 was full of major developments in efforts to understand and protect the world's tropical rainforests. The following is a review of some of the major tropical forest-related news stories for the year. As a review, this post will not cover everything that transpired during 2013 in the world of tropical forests. Please feel free to highlight anything this post missed via the comments section at the bottom. Also please note that this review focuses only on tropical forests.


    Satellites reveal browning mountain forests

    (11/22/2013) In a dramatic response to global warming, tropical forests in the high elevation areas of five continents have been "browning" since the 1990s. They have been steadily losing foliage, and showing less photosynthetic activity. Scientists analyzed the forest cover by using satellites to measure sunlight bouncing off the surface of the earth, then determining the different surface types via reflection patterns.


    Canopy crusade: world's highest network of camera traps keeps an eye on animals impacted by gas project

    (11/21/2013) Oil, gas, timber, gold: the Amazon rainforest is rich in resources, and their exploitation is booming. As resource extraction increases, so does the development of access roads and pipelines. These carve their way through previously intact forest, thereby interrupting the myriad pathways of the species that live there. For species that depend on the rainforest canopy, this can be particularly problematic.


    The quicksilver demon: rogue gold-mining is the world's largest source of mercury pollution

    (11/20/2013) In 1956, in the quiet seaside town of Minamata on the southwestern coast of Japan's Kyushu Island, cats began to behave very strangely. They convulsed, displayed excessive salivation, and gradually lost the ability to walk. Then, dead birds began to fall out of the sky. Shellfish opened and decomposed. Fish also displayed abnormal behaviors, eventually floating up to the surface of the Shiranui Sea. Many of the ailing cats wandered into the sea and drowned. Soon, there were no more cats alive in the area.


    Prize exploring the next big idea in rainforest conservation announced

    (11/16/2013) Mongabay.org, a non-profit that aims to raise awareness about social and environmental issues relating to tropical forests and other ecosystems, has announced the first winner of its environmental reporting prize its Special Reporting Initiative (SRI) program. The prize sought proposals to explore the question of what's the next big idea in tropical biodiversity conservation. After a two-month application window and a month of deliberations, this week an independent panel of journalists and tropical forest specialists selected environmental journalist Wendee Nicole as the first recipient of the Mongabay Prize for Environmental Reporting.


    Scientists identify 137 protected areas most important for preserving biodiversity

    (11/14/2013) Want to save the world's biodiversity from mass extinction? Then make certain to safeguard the 74 sites identified today in a new study in Science. Evaluating 173,000 terrestrial protected areas, scientists pulled out the most important ones for global biodiversity based on the number of threatened mammals, birds, and amphibians found in the parks. In all they identified 137 protected areas (spread over 74 sites as many protected areas were in the same region) in 34 countries as 'irreplaceable.'


    Rebranded as the Rainforest Trust, green group launches push to protect 6M acres of Amazon rainforest

    (10/30/2013) The Rainforest Trust, which from 1988 until last month was known as the World Land Trust-US, has kicked off an effort to preserve some 2.4 million hectares (5.9 million acres) of rainforest in a remote part of the Peruvian Amazon.


    Gold mining in the Amazon rainforest surges 400%

    (10/28/2013) The extent of gold mining in the Peruvian Amazon has surged 400 percent since 1999 due to rocketing gold prices, wreaking havoc on forests and devastating local rivers, finds a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). The assessment, led by Greg Asner of the Carnegie Institution for Science, is based on a combination of satellite imagery, on-the-ground field surveys, and an advanced airplane-based sensor that can accurately measure the rainforest canopy and sub-canopy vegetation at a resolution of 1.1 meters (42 inches).


    Fishermen illegally killing dolphins for shark-bait in Peru (video)

    (10/23/2013) Peruvian fishermen slaughtered dolphins to use as bait for shark fishing, an undercover investigation has revealed. Footage showed infant and adult dolphins being harpooned then stabbed and clubbed before, in some cases, being cut open and butchered while still alive. The slaughtered dolphins were cut up and used as bait. Dolphins are also killed for human consumption in Peru even though it is illegal.


    Map reveals gas company flying over Manu National Park

    (10/17/2013) A map in an internal Peruvian government report reveals that gas company Pluspetrol has been flying over the protected Manu National Park (MNP) in the south-eastern Peruvian Amazon where UNESCO says the biodiversity "exceeds that of any other place on earth." The over-flight was done via helicopter on 3 February, 2012 by Pluspetrol personnel together with a team from the National Institute e Development of Andean, Amazonian and Afroperuvian Peoples (INDEPA).


    Featured video: 22-year-old produces documentary on the Peruvian Amazon

    (10/15/2013) Spending a year on the Tambopata River in Peru's deep Amazon, allowed 22-year-old Tristan Thompson, to record stunning video of the much the region's little seen, and little known, wildlife. Thompson, a student at the University of the West of England, has turned his footage into a new documentary An Untamed Wilderness that not only gives viewers an inside look at the world's greatest forests, but also records the secretive behavior of many species, including howler monkeys, aracaris, leaf-cutter ants, hoatzin, and giant river otters.


    3 Peruvian states join sub-national push for REDD+

    (10/11/2013) An initiative that is developing a framework for REDD+ programs at state and provincial levels gained three more members last week.


    Video of Amazon gold mining devastation goes viral in Peru

    (09/26/2013) Video of illegal gold mining operations that have turned a portion of the Amazon rainforest into a moonscape went viral on Youtube after a popular radio and TV journalist in Peru highlighted the story. Last week Peruvian journalist and politician Guido Lombardi directed his followers to video shot from a wingcam aboard the Carnegie Airborne Observatory (CAO), an airplane used by researchers to conduct advanced monitoring and analysis of Peru's forests. The video quickly received more than 60,000 views on Youtube.


    Climate change could kill off Andean cloud forests, home to thousands of species found nowhere else

    (09/18/2013) One of the richest ecosystems on the planet may not survive a hotter climate without human help, according to a sobering new paper in the open source journal PLoS ONE. Although little-studied compared to lowland rainforests, the cloud forests of the Andes are known to harbor explosions of life, including thousands of species found nowhere else. Many of these species—from airy ferns to beautiful orchids to tiny frogs—thrive in small ranges that are temperature-dependent. But what happens when the climate heats up?


    Scientists discover that threatened bird migrates entirely within Amazon Basin

    (09/11/2013) When one thinks of bird migrations, it's usually a north-south route that follows seasonal climates. But researchers in the Amazon have tracked, for the first time, a largely-unknown long-distance migration that sticks entirely to the Amazon Basin. Using satellite telemetry, scientists tracked a pair of Orinoco geese (Neochen jubata) from Peru and a male from Western Brazil, who both migrated to the Llanos de Moxos, a vast savanna and Amazonian watershed in Bolivia. The research has shown that the Orinoco geese—which breeds in both Peru and Brazil—depends on wetlands in the Llanos de Moxos for much of the year.


    Satellite reveals 'hidden' 1000-ha oil palm plantation in Amazon rainforest in Peru

    (09/06/2013) A regional forestry official in Peru has expressed surprise over the sudden appearance of a 1000-hectare oil palm plantation in the heart of the Amazon rainforest.


    Isolated Amazonian tribe makes another appearance in Peru (video)

    (08/26/2013) Over 100 members of a voluntarily isolated tribe emerged from the jungles of Peru in a rare appearance on the Las Piedras River across from the a Yine Indian community in late June. Belonging to the Mascho-Piro Indians, members of the "uncontacted" tribe are occasionally seen on riverbanks during the dry season, but appearances in such numbers and so close to a local community was unprecedented.




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    Copyright Rhett Butler 1994-2012

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