Botswana | Dominican Republic | Guyana | Malaysia | Suriname | Zimbabwe
Home
News
About
Contribute
Jeremy & Tiffany
  Arizona
  Botswana
  Dominican Republic
  Guyana
  Ecuador
  Malaysia
  Minnesota
  New Mexico
  Suriname
  Zimbabwe
Travel Photos
  Argentina
  Australia
  Belize
  Bhutan
  Botswana
  Brazil
  Burma
  Cambodia
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Ecuador
  Gabon
  Grand Canyon
  Honduras
  Iceland
  India
  Indonesia
  Italy
  Jordan
  Kenya
  Laos
  Madagascar
  Malaysia
  Mexico
  Panama
  Peru
  Nepal
  New Zealand
  Slovenia
  Tanzania
  Thailand
  Uganda
  United States
  Venezuela
Photos by topic
  Birds
  Coral reefs
  Deforestation
  Frogs
  Glaciers
  Insects
  Lemurs
  Mammals
  Monkeys
  Rainforests
  Reptiles
  Sunsets
  Wildlife
  MORE
Rainforests
For kids
Tropical Fish
Travel Tips
Rainforest Tips
Non-English languages
Books
T-shirts
Calendars
Newsletter
Copyright
Contact


Photos by Jeremy Hance and Tiffany Roufs

Jeremy is a writer for mongabay.com. His wife Tiffany is an amateur photographer.

  • Arizona
  • Botswana
  • Dominican Republic
  • Ecuador
  • Guyana
  • Malaysia
  • Minnesota
  • New Mexico
  • Suriname
  • Zimbabwe


    Recent stories by Jeremy

    Elephant poaching rate unchanged – and still devastating

    (03/25/2015) New figures show essentially no change in the number of elephants killed in Africa by poachers last year, despite a high-profile meeting on the crisis which was attended by 46 countries and a number of commitments. Data from CITES' Monitoring the Illegal Killing of Elephants (MIKE) estimated that around 20,000 elephants were killed in 2014, the same as in 2013.


    Photos: expedition to Amazon’s white sands may have found new primate

    (03/24/2015) Most people think of the Amazon rainforest as one massive, homogenous ecosystem—a giant castle of green. However, within the Amazon rainforest lie a myriad of distinct ecosystems, sporting unique characteristics and harboring endemic species. One of the rarer ecosystems in the Amazon is the white sands forest.


    Halloween in the Amazon: baby bird dresses up like killer caterpillar

    (03/23/2015) 'Mama, I wanna be a toxic caterpillar,' says the little bird. 'Okay,' mamma answers, 'but first you gotta study your Batesian mimicry.' Meet the cinereous mourner, an ash-colored, Amazonian bird that looks rather hum-drum compared to many other birds found in the region. Yet, scientists have discovered something special about the birds: its newborn babies look and move like a neon orange, toxic caterpillar.


    The great Arctic decline: another sea ice record broken

    (03/23/2015) Every winter, sea ice in the Arctic expands, providing vital habitat for birthing seals, hunting polar bears, and foraging walruses. But as the Arctic has warmed faster than any place on the planet—due climate change caused by burning fossil fuels—sea ice is not expanding as far as it once did.


    Carbon emissions flatlined last year

    (03/19/2015) Global carbon emission plateaued last year, according to International Energy Agency, even as the world's economy grew three percent. This is the first time carbon emissions have stalled in the absence of an economic collapse. The news provides tentative hope that the world may finally tackling climate change ahead of much-anticipated climate talks in Paris.


    DRC mulls changing Virunga's boundaries for oil

    (03/19/2015) Last Friday, the government of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) announced it was considering changing the boundaries of Virunga National Park to accommodate oil exploitation. Africa's oldest park, Virunga is home to around a quarter of the world's mountain gorillas as well as thousands of other species, many of them threatened with extinction.


    Discovery of 'Lost City' spurs conservation pledge

    (03/18/2015) Earlier this month, National Geographic made big news: the discovery of what it called a 'lost city' below the thick jungles of Honduras. While the coverage has led to scientists crying sensationalism, it also resulted this week in a commitment of protection by the Honduras President, Juan Orlando Hernández, for a long-neglected portion of the country.


    Conservationists catch-and-release record-smashing freshwater fish

    (03/17/2015) Conservationists and scientists have managed to catch-and-release what could be the world's biggest freshwater fish ever for an upcoming episode of Ocean Mysteries. Naturalist and host of the show, Jeff Corwin—along with wildlife veterinarian, Nantarika Chansue, and the tourist fishing group, fishsiam.com—managed to reel in a giant freshwater stingray.


    King of the jungle returns to Gabon after nearly 20 year absence

    (03/16/2015) There's a new cat in town. For the first time since 1996, conservationists have proof of a lion roaming the wilds of the Central African country of Gabon. The lion—a healthy-looking, young male—was caught on camera trap in Batéké Plateau National Park, a 20,200 hectare expanse of grasslands and gallery forests.


    Scientists warn G20 that $60 trillion infrastructure plan is "doubling down on a dangerous vision"

    (03/13/2015) If there's one thing most governments and even political parties appear to agree on it's a desire for more infrastructure, i.e. more roads, dams, bridges, power plants, airports and seaports, sewers, pipelines, and telecommunication systems. At the most recent G20 meeting in Brisbane, the world's biggest economies agreed on the need for more infrastructure around the globe, including a plan to boost infrastructure spending by trillions of dollars by 2030 and setting up a so-called Global Infrastructure Hub.


    New study argues the Anthropocene began in 1610

    (03/11/2015) In 1610, William Shakespeare began penning one of his greatest plays, The Tempest, which some critics view as a commentary on European colonization of far-away islands and continents. Along those lines, a study today in Nature argues that 1610 is the first year of the human-dominated epoch, known as the Anthropocene, due to the upheavals caused by the 'discovery' of the New World.


    Hunters and birdwatchers make good conservationists in the U.S.

    (03/11/2015) What do hunters and birdwatchers have in common? Both groups are much more likely to support conservation than the average rural American, according to new research published in the Journal of Wildlife Management.


    Tiger family photo surprises scientists

    (03/10/2015) In a frigid Russian forest, a camera trap snapped 21 family photos over two minutes. This wasn't a usual family, though, this was a tiger family, more specifically an Amur tiger family. And this wasn't even a usual tiger family: the cameras showed a dad leading the way.


    Human impacts are 'decoupling' coral reef ecosystems

    (03/09/2015) There is a growing consensus among scientists that we have entered the age of the Anthropocene, or the epoch of humans. In other words, at some point between the 12,000 years separating the beginning of agriculture and the Industrial Revolution, humans became the dominant source of change on the planet, shaping everything from the land to the atmosphere to even the geologic record where we etch our reign.


    Last ditch: Mexico finally gets serious about saving the vaquita

    (03/04/2015) There are likely less than 100 vaquita on the planet. Found only in the northern pocket of the Sea of Cortez in Mexico, the vaquita is a tiny, shy porpoise that has been brought to the very edge of extinction due to drowning in gillnets used for shrimping. But after years of stalling, Mexico now appears to be making a final effort to save the world's most endangered cetacean.


    Employing shame for environmental change

    (03/03/2015) Anyone who has ever felt the sting of shame, knows its power. Shame has long been used by societal institutions—families, communities, governments, religions—for making individuals tow the line of the majority. But a new book explores another—arguably more positive—side of shame: its potential to challenge rule-breaking and ethically-defunct corporations.


    How the Sahara keeps the Amazon rainforest going

    (03/02/2015) Scientists have just uncovered an incredible link between the world's largest desert (the Sahara) and its largest rainforest (the Amazon). New research published in Geophysical Research Letters theorizes that the Sahara Desert replenishes phosphorus in the Amazon rainforest via vast plumes of desert dust blowing over the Atlantic Ocean.


    Giant panda population rises by nearly 17 percent

    (03/02/2015) One of the most iconic animals on the planet got good news this week. The world's giant panda population has risen by 268 individuals over the last decade, hitting a total of 1,864 animals, according to China's fourth decadal survey. This represents a total rise of 16.8 percent.


    Photos: Amur leopard population hits at least 65

    (02/26/2015) Most of the world's big predators are in decline, but there are some happy stories out there. This week, WWF announced that the Amur leopard population has grown to a total of 65-69 cats. This represents a more than doubling of the population in eight years. Still, the Critically Endangered subspecies remains perilously close to extinction.


    Cambodia deports activist leader...then suspends controversial dam

    (02/25/2015) On Monday, Cambodia deported well-known environmental activist, Alex Gonzalez-Davidson, back to his native Spain. Co-founder of the Cambodian NGO, Mother Nature, Gonzalez-Davidson played a vital role in blocking efforts to build the Cheay Areng Dam. But a day after deporting the activist, Cambodia's Prime Minister, Hun Sen, said the country would postpone the dam until 2018.


    Protected areas receive 8 billion visits a year, but still underfunded

    (02/25/2015) The world loves its protected areas, according to a new study in the open access PLOS Biology. U.S. and UK researchers estimated that the world's protected areas received eight billion visits every year. Moreover, the research found that the world's 140,000 protected areas likely brought in at least $600 billion to national economies.


    $7 million could save lemurs from extinction

    (02/25/2015) Last year, scientists released an emergency three-year plan that they argued could, quite literally, save the world's lemurs from mass extinction. Costing just $7.6 million, the plan focused on setting up better protections in 30 lemur hotspots. However, there was one sticking point: donating to small programs in one of the world's poorest countries was not exactly user friendly.


    Locals lead scientists to new population of near-extinct reptile

    (02/24/2015) By the early Twentieth Century, the world had pretty much given up on the Arakan forest turtle, named after the hills where it was found in 1875 in western Myanmar. Now, this Lazarus reptile —which has been dubbed one of the 25 most threatened turtles on the planet —has more good news: researchers have documented an entirely new population where no one


    Are small-scale hydro projects always greener?

    (02/23/2015) Rising energy demand and global efforts to mitigate climate change have made renewable energy projects increasingly attractive. One widely known and well-developed source of renewable energy is hydroelectricity. However, past environmental campaigns against large dams have resulted in policy changes in some parts of the world, leading to an increasing number of small hydropower projects.


    Bison-sized rodent may have used teeth like elephant tusks

    (02/23/2015) The world's largest rodent today is the capybara, weighing in at around at about 45 kilograms (100 pounds), though the record breaking female weight in at 91 kilograms (201 pounds). But that's nothing compared to the biggest rodent ever to live. Discovered in Uruguay in 2008, Josephoartigasia monesi may have weighed in at 1,000 kilograms (2,200 pounds).


    Authorities catch kingpin responsible for killing 20 rhinos

    (02/19/2015) With the aid of Interpol, authorities have arrested the leader of a rhino poaching gang responsible for killing a 20 Indian rhinoceros in Nepal. Last month, authorities nabbed Raj Kumar Praja in Malaysia where he had been evading capture for two years. Kumar was already evicted of 15 poaching incidents in absentia and sentenced to 15 years in prison.


    Scientists uncover new seadragon

    (02/18/2015) For 150 years, scientists have known of just two so-called seadragons: the leafy seadragon and the weedy seadragon. But a new paper in the Royal Society Open Science has announced the discovery of a third, dubbed the ruby seadragon for its incredible bright-red coloring. Found only off the southern Australian coastline, seadragons belong to the same family as the more familiar seahorses: the Syngnathidae.


    42 pangolins rescued...then sold to restaurants

    (02/17/2015) On February 1st, local police seized 42 live Sunda pangolins from poachers and handed them over to forest rangers in Vietnam's northern province of Bac Ninh. While the poachers were slapped with a fine, the rangers turned around and sold the live pangolins to local restaurants for a reported $56 a kilo, netting a total of $11,300 for the Critically Endangered mammals.


    Arctic upheaval: new book outlines challenges at the top of the world

    (02/16/2015) For most of us, the Arctic is not at the front of our minds. We view it as cold, stark, and, most importantly, distant. Yet, even in an age of vast ecological upheaval, one could argue that no biome in the world is changing so rapidly or so irrevocably. Two hundred plus years of burning fossil fuels has warmed up the top of our planet more quickly than anywhere else.


    Sabah shocked by banteng poaching

    (02/16/2015) Malaysia's Daily Express recently published graphic photos of poachers in the Malaysian state of Sabah posing proudly with a number of illegally slaughtered large animals, including the incredibly rare and cryptic banteng. Wild, forest cattle, banteng are scattered across parts of Southeast Asia, but Borneo is home to a distinct subspecies: Bos javanicus lowi.


    U.S. Central Plains and Southwest will likely face apocalyptic drought

    (02/12/2015) In the recent film Interstellar, a mysterious phenomenon known as "the blight" is wiping out agriculture around the world until only corn—for some reason—survives. Humanity is on the brink of starvation. While the blight may be science fiction, global warming is not, and a new study finds that future warming could decimate the western U.S. over the next century.


    Feds confirm first wolf in the Grand Canyon area shot dead

    (02/12/2015) Last fall, tourists to the north rim of the Grand Canyon reported seeing a gray wolf. The only problem was there had been no wolves in the area for over 70 years. Still, it turned out the animal in question was not a coyote or stray dog, but, indeed a female gray wolf known as "914F". She had migrated hundreds of miles from the northern Rockies. Unfortunately, this was near the end of her story.


    Mining activist released after being charged with terrorism, rebellion in Ecuador

    (02/11/2015) Yesterday, mining and environmental activist, Javier Ramírez, walked out of an Ecuadorian courtroom with his freedom. Ramírez, who has long fought against a massive state-owned massive copper mine in the cloud forest village of Junin, was arrested in April last year and subsequently charged with rebellion, sabotage, and terrorism among other thing.


    Pollution from fossil fuels decreased rainfall in Central America

    (02/10/2015) Fossil fuel pollution may have caused a southern shift in a vital rainfall belt across Central America, according to a new study in Nature Geoscience, potentially leading to drier conditions and droughts in some northern tropical countries. Using data from a single stalagmite in a Belizean cave, the researchers were able to create an accurate record of both rainfall and temperature for the last 450 years.


    Norway sovereign fund drops coal, tar sands, gold-mining companies

    (02/09/2015) In its first-ever report on responsible investing, Norway's pension fund announced last week that it has divested from 114 companies in the past three years due to concerns over global warming, deforestation, and sustainability as well as long-term financial viability. Worth a staggering $861 billion, Norway's Government Pension Fund Global (GPFG) is the world's largest sovereign wealth fund.


    Pollinator collapse could lead to a rise in malnutrition

    (02/09/2015) Saving the world's pollinators may be a public health issue, according to recent research. Scientists have long believed that pollinators are important for human nutrition, but this is first time they have tested the hypothesis. What they found is disturbing: pollinator collapse could increase nutrient deficiency across local populations by a up to 56 percent in four developing counties.


    How termites hold back the desert

    (02/05/2015) Some termite species erect massive mounds that look like great temples springing up from the world's savannas and drylands. But aside from their aesthetic appeal—and incredible engineering—new research in Science finds that these structures do something remarkable for the ecosystem: they hold back the desert.


    World Parks Congress talks the talk, but future depends on action

    (02/05/2015) Last year, more than 6,000 people gathered for the World Parks Congress 2014, an event held around every ten years by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). The World Parks Congress discusses myriad issues related to protected areas, which recent research has shown are in rough shape.


    The Amazon's oil boom: concessions cover a Chile-sized bloc of rainforest

    (02/04/2015) Hungry for oil revenue, governments and fossil fuel companies are moving even further into one of the world's last great wildernesses, according to a new study in the journal Environmental Research Letters. The total area set aside for oil and gas in the Western Amazon has grown by 150,000 square kilometers since 2008, now totaling more than 730,000 square kilometers—an area the size of Chile.


    Super-rare carnivore photographed in Yosemite after missing for nearly a century

    (02/03/2015) For years, biologists believed the Sierra Nevada fox was down to a single population of around 20 animals in California's Lassen Volcanic National Park. But then in 2010, biologists found a small population near Sonora Pass. Now, more good news: last week, scientists documented the first Sierra Nevada fox in Yosemite National Park in nearly 100 years.





  • what's new | rainforests | tropical fish | for kids | search | about | copyright & use | contact

    Copyright mongabay.com 2009