Botswana | Dominican Republic | Guyana | Malaysia | Suriname | Zimbabwe
Home
News
About
Contribute
Jeremy & Tiffany
  Arizona
  Botswana
  Dominican Republic
  Guyana
  Ecuador
  Malaysia
  Minnesota
  New Mexico
  Suriname
  Zimbabwe
Travel Photos
  Argentina
  Australia
  Belize
  Bhutan
  Botswana
  Brazil
  Burma
  Cambodia
  China
  Colombia
  Costa Rica
  Croatia
  Ecuador
  Gabon
  Grand Canyon
  Honduras
  Iceland
  India
  Indonesia
  Italy
  Jordan
  Kenya
  Laos
  Madagascar
  Malaysia
  Mexico
  Panama
  Peru
  Nepal
  New Zealand
  Slovenia
  Tanzania
  Thailand
  Uganda
  United States
  Venezuela
Photos by topic
  Birds
  Coral reefs
  Deforestation
  Frogs
  Glaciers
  Insects
  Lemurs
  Mammals
  Monkeys
  Rainforests
  Reptiles
  Sunsets
  Wildlife
  MORE
Rainforests
For kids
Tropical Fish
Travel Tips
Rainforest Tips
Non-English languages
Books
T-shirts
Calendars
Newsletter
Copyright
Contact


Photos by Jeremy Hance and Tiffany Roufs

Jeremy is a writer for mongabay.com. His wife Tiffany is an amateur photographer.

  • Arizona
  • Botswana
  • Dominican Republic
  • Ecuador
  • Guyana
  • Malaysia
  • Minnesota
  • New Mexico
  • Suriname
  • Zimbabwe


    Recent stories by Jeremy

    120,000 dead: half of the world's saiga die in less than a month

    (05/28/2015) No one knows what's killing them, but scientists estimate that almost half of the world's saiga (Saiga tatarica) have perished since May 10th. To date, researchers on-the-ground unofficially estimate that 120,000 saiga have died in Kazakhstan from what appears to be a wildly virulent disease, although no cause has been ruled out.


    Uganda's elephant population has risen 600% since its 1980s low

    (05/27/2015) In the 1980s, Uganda's elephants looked like they were on their way to extinction. The country had only about 700-800 elephants left, all in a single park; poachers had exterminated the rest. But a new survey as a part of the Great Elephant Census has confirmed that Uganda is today a bright spot in the current ivory poaching crisis. The country has more than 5,000 elephants and growing.


    Mozambique loses almost 10,000 elephants in just five years

    (05/26/2015) Mozambique has lost nearly half of its elephants to relentless, brutal, and highly-organized poaching in just five years, according to a new government survey. In 2010, the country was home to an estimated 20,000 pachyderms, today it houses just 10,300.


    Nepal's rhino population rises by 72% in ten years

    (05/26/2015) A new survey in Nepal counted 645 one-horned rhinos, up from 375 animals ten years ago and 534 animals in 2011. This represent a rise of 72 percent over the last ten years, an impressive feat given that the world's rhinos are facing a savage poaching crisis.


    South African Airways bans all wildlife trophies from flights

    (05/14/2015) Trophy hunters may need to find another flight home, as South African Airlines (SAA) has announced a new ban on any wildlife trophies from their flights. The debate over trophy hunting in Africa is rising as many of the continent's most beloved mammals—including lions, elephants, rhinos, and giraffes—face precipitous declines.


    Rhino poaching rate rises 18 percent in South Africa

    (05/13/2015) In the first four months of 2015, poachers killed 393 rhinos in South Africa, the epicenter of the rhino poaching crisis. This is an 18 percent rise from last year, which saw 1,215 rhinos butchered in total. Like previous years, the biggest hotspot was Kruger National Park where 290 rhinos have died so far.


    The triumph of the bison: Europe's biggest animal bounces back a century after vanishing

    (05/12/2015) On a path flanked by thick woods, I first spied our quarry. When she appeared, far away between the long verticals of bare trees, I could hardly believe she was there. She was a ghost, a specter haunting this winter forest. Her horns were prettily curved, her face slender, her whole 400 kilogram (880 pound) mass framed by the trees.


    Videos reveal rare birds, wild monkeys, and jaguar family in oil-exploited park

    (05/11/2015) A compilation of new camera trap videos from Yasuni National Park shows off rarely seen species like the rufuos-vented ground cuckoo and the short-eared dog as well as odd behavior, like sloths licking salt from the ground. The compilation is produced by Diego Mosquera, manager and head of the camera trap program at Tiputini Biodiversity Station.


    CO2 levels hit monthly average not seen for 2 million years

    (05/07/2015) For the first time in human history, carbon dioxide concentrations averaged out at 400 parts per million (ppm) worldwide in March, according to NOAA. Carbon dioxide concentrations have likely not hit such levels in two million years—long before Homo sapiens evolved.


    Ranger killed by poachers in park known for grisly elephant slaughters

    (05/07/2015) On April 25th, poachers shot and killed wildlife ranger, Agoyo Mbikoyo, in Garamba National Park in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), according to the organization African Parks. On the frontline of the illegal wildlife trade, Garamba Naitonal Park is known as a hotspot for elephant poaching.


    Scientists identify frog through DNA without leaving forest

    (05/05/2015) Yesterday, a team of Italian scientists caught a frog in a montane forest in Tanzania. And then they made history: using a small blood sample the team were able to extract, purify, and amplify the amphibian's DNA—all in the forest—through a new, battery-powered device called the Expedition Genomics Lab.


    Photos: new zoo exhibit dramatically displays real threat to Asian turtle

    (05/04/2015) Usually animal pens in zoos are designed to resemble a species' native habitat: lions in sprawling savanna, pandas in bamboo forests, and crocodiles in mangroves. But a new pen at the Zoological Society of London (ZSL)'s London Zoo is meant to dramatically highlight not a species' habitat, but it's biggest threat.


    Ongoing overkill: loss of big herbivores leading to 'empty landscapes'

    (05/01/2015) Ten thousand years from now, human historians—or alien ones—may view the current wave of biodiversity loss and extinctions as concurrent with the Pleistocene extinction. At that time, peaking around 11,000 years ago, many scientists argue that human hunters killed off the majority of the world's big species. According to a paper today in history may be repeating itself.


    Featured video: the Uncharted Amazon trailer

    (04/29/2015) The up-coming documentary, Uncharted Amazon, promises to highlight both the little-seen wildlife and the people of the Las Piedras River system in the Peruvian Amazon, one of the most remote wildernesses on the planet.


    EU votes to scale back on biofuels linked to deforestation

    (04/28/2015) The European Parliament voted overwhelmingly today on a new cap on biofuels derived from edible crops, which critics say not only compete with feeding a growing global population but also contribute to deforestation and release unacceptably high levels of greenhouse gas emissions. The new legislation sets the cap on edible food crop biofuels—such as palm oil, corn, rapeseed, and soy—at seven percent.


    Five tons of frozen pangolin: Indonesian authorities make massive bust

    (04/28/2015) Five tons of frozen pangolin, 77 kilograms (169 pounds) of pangolin scales, and 96 live pangolins: that's the grisly haul of the latest pangolin bust in Indonesia. Officials confiscated the illegal wildlife goods in Medan, Sumatra and busted the smuggler, who has only been identified as SHB. This is the largest pangolin bust in Indonesia since 2008.


    Illegal ivory trade alive and well on Craigslist

    (04/28/2015) As it has become more difficult to buy illegal ivory from slaughtered elephants on places like eBay, Etsy, and Amazon.com, traders and buyers in the U.S. have turned to another venue: Craigslist. A new report by the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) and the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) finds that the ivory trade is thriving on Craigslist.


    Officials: Sumatran rhino is extinct in the wild in Sabah

    (04/23/2015) There are no Sumatran rhinos left in the wild in the Malaysian state of Sabah, confirmed Masidi Manjun, the Tourism, Culture and Envi­ronment Minister, over the weekend. In 2008, conservationists estimated there were around 50 rhinos in the state. Five years later, it dropped that estimate to just ten. Now, it's admitted the awful truth: the wild rhino is very likely gone.


    Photo essay: the flying fox show

    (04/22/2015) Rain or clear, wind or still, full moon or no. Every night thousands of flying foxes rise from a small mangrove island among the lesser Sunda islands of Indonesia. Around sunset the Sunda flying fox begin to stir in their roots—their stomachs waking them—until the boldest among them takes off into the sky.


    Camera traps catch rare Amazon bird following peccaries

    (04/21/2015) Although a large, attractive bird found across Latin America, scientists know almost nothing about the rufous-vented ground cuckoo (Neomorphus geoffroyi). Renzo Piana, the director of science and research with the Amazon Conservation Association, described the bird as "rare," "cryptic," "mainly solitary," and "mostly silent"—much of which explains why so little is known about it.


    Killings of environmental activists jumped by 20 percent last year

    (04/20/2015) The assassination, murder, and extrajudicial killing of environmental activists rose by 20 percent last year, according to a new grim report by Global Witness. The organization documented 116 killings in 2014 across 17 countries with the highest number in Brazil, which saw 29 environmental and land defenders killed.


    Expert panel rebukes Japan's new whaling proposal

    (04/15/2015) Last year, the International Court of Justice (ICJ) ruled that Japan must halt its whaling activities in the Southern Ocean as it found no evidence that the killing of hundreds of Antarctic minke whales was scientifically justified. The ruling sent Japan scrambling for a new plan to continue its 'scientific' whale hunt. But, now an expert panel has rebuked Japan's latest plan as well.


    Expedition in the Congo rediscovers lost primate

    (04/14/2015) The last time there was a sighting of Bouvier's red colobus disco was all the rage, the Internet was non-existent, and Madonna still referred solely to the mother of God. But then the African monkey vanished and conservationists feared it had gone extinct—a victim of the bushmeat trade. For years, research groups called for an expedition to find out if Bouvier's red colobus still survived.


    Anti-mining activist shot dead in Guatemala

    (04/13/2015) Earlier this month, environmental activist, Telésforo Odilo Pivaral Gonzalez, was killed by unknown assailants who shot him five times. The father of six children (ages 1-11), Pivaral Gonzalez had actively opposed a conflict-ridden Escobal silver mine project run by Canadian company, Tahoe Resources, and its local subsidiary, Minera San Rafael SA.


    Australia becomes first country to ban lion trophies

    (04/09/2015) Last month, Australia became the world's first country to ban the import or export of lion trophies, often taken from so-called canned hunting where lions are raised solely to be shot by foreign hunters.


    New group hopes to raise global profile of the peace-loving bonobo

    (04/08/2015) Of the world's six species of great ape (not including us), it's safe to say that bonobos (Pan paniscus) are the least studied and least known publicly. But a new organization, the Bonobo Project, is hoping to change that. To the untrained eye, a bonobo looks little different from their closest relative, the chimpanzee. But the differences between these two cousins are actually quite large.


    Elephant poaching rate unchanged – and still devastating

    (03/25/2015) New figures show essentially no change in the number of elephants killed in Africa by poachers last year, despite a high-profile meeting on the crisis which was attended by 46 countries and a number of commitments. Data from CITES' Monitoring the Illegal Killing of Elephants (MIKE) estimated that around 20,000 elephants were killed in 2014, the same as in 2013.


    Photos: expedition to Amazon’s white sands may have found new primate

    (03/24/2015) Most people think of the Amazon rainforest as one massive, homogenous ecosystem—a giant castle of green. However, within the Amazon rainforest lie a myriad of distinct ecosystems, sporting unique characteristics and harboring endemic species. One of the rarer ecosystems in the Amazon is the white sands forest.


    Halloween in the Amazon: baby bird dresses up like killer caterpillar

    (03/23/2015) 'Mama, I wanna be a toxic caterpillar,' says the little bird. 'Okay,' mamma answers, 'but first you gotta study your Batesian mimicry.' Meet the cinereous mourner, an ash-colored, Amazonian bird that looks rather hum-drum compared to many other birds found in the region. Yet, scientists have discovered something special about the birds: its newborn babies look and move like a neon orange, toxic caterpillar.


    The great Arctic decline: another sea ice record broken

    (03/23/2015) Every winter, sea ice in the Arctic expands, providing vital habitat for birthing seals, hunting polar bears, and foraging walruses. But as the Arctic has warmed faster than any place on the planet—due climate change caused by burning fossil fuels—sea ice is not expanding as far as it once did.


    Carbon emissions flatlined last year

    (03/19/2015) Global carbon emission plateaued last year, according to International Energy Agency, even as the world's economy grew three percent. This is the first time carbon emissions have stalled in the absence of an economic collapse. The news provides tentative hope that the world may finally tackling climate change ahead of much-anticipated climate talks in Paris.


    DRC mulls changing Virunga's boundaries for oil

    (03/19/2015) Last Friday, the government of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) announced it was considering changing the boundaries of Virunga National Park to accommodate oil exploitation. Africa's oldest park, Virunga is home to around a quarter of the world's mountain gorillas as well as thousands of other species, many of them threatened with extinction.


    Discovery of 'Lost City' spurs conservation pledge

    (03/18/2015) Earlier this month, National Geographic made big news: the discovery of what it called a 'lost city' below the thick jungles of Honduras. While the coverage has led to scientists crying sensationalism, it also resulted this week in a commitment of protection by the Honduras President, Juan Orlando Hernández, for a long-neglected portion of the country.


    Conservationists catch-and-release record-smashing freshwater fish

    (03/17/2015) Conservationists and scientists have managed to catch-and-release what could be the world's biggest freshwater fish ever for an upcoming episode of Ocean Mysteries. Naturalist and host of the show, Jeff Corwin—along with wildlife veterinarian, Nantarika Chansue, and the tourist fishing group, fishsiam.com—managed to reel in a giant freshwater stingray.


    King of the jungle returns to Gabon after nearly 20 year absence

    (03/16/2015) There's a new cat in town. For the first time since 1996, conservationists have proof of a lion roaming the wilds of the Central African country of Gabon. The lion—a healthy-looking, young male—was caught on camera trap in Batéké Plateau National Park, a 20,200 hectare expanse of grasslands and gallery forests.


    Scientists warn G20 that $60 trillion infrastructure plan is "doubling down on a dangerous vision"

    (03/13/2015) If there's one thing most governments and even political parties appear to agree on it's a desire for more infrastructure, i.e. more roads, dams, bridges, power plants, airports and seaports, sewers, pipelines, and telecommunication systems. At the most recent G20 meeting in Brisbane, the world's biggest economies agreed on the need for more infrastructure around the globe, including a plan to boost infrastructure spending by trillions of dollars by 2030 and setting up a so-called Global Infrastructure Hub.


    New study argues the Anthropocene began in 1610

    (03/11/2015) In 1610, William Shakespeare began penning one of his greatest plays, The Tempest, which some critics view as a commentary on European colonization of far-away islands and continents. Along those lines, a study today in Nature argues that 1610 is the first year of the human-dominated epoch, known as the Anthropocene, due to the upheavals caused by the 'discovery' of the New World.


    Hunters and birdwatchers make good conservationists in the U.S.

    (03/11/2015) What do hunters and birdwatchers have in common? Both groups are much more likely to support conservation than the average rural American, according to new research published in the Journal of Wildlife Management.


    Tiger family photo surprises scientists

    (03/10/2015) In a frigid Russian forest, a camera trap snapped 21 family photos over two minutes. This wasn't a usual family, though, this was a tiger family, more specifically an Amur tiger family. And this wasn't even a usual tiger family: the cameras showed a dad leading the way.


    Human impacts are 'decoupling' coral reef ecosystems

    (03/09/2015) There is a growing consensus among scientists that we have entered the age of the Anthropocene, or the epoch of humans. In other words, at some point between the 12,000 years separating the beginning of agriculture and the Industrial Revolution, humans became the dominant source of change on the planet, shaping everything from the land to the atmosphere to even the geologic record where we etch our reign.





  • what's new | rainforests | tropical fish | for kids | search | about | copyright & use | contact

    Copyright mongabay.com 2009