CHINA: Slideshow | Shanghai | Yunnan | Xinjiang

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Photos from Xinjiang, a Muslim region in western China -- 10/09/2006
Xinjiang, China's largest and western-most province, is one of the planet's most remote and desolate regions. Covering more than one-sixth the country's territory, Xinjiang borders Tibet, Mongolia, Russia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Afghanistan, and Pakistan, and is dominated by ethnic minorities, notably the Muslim Uyghurs who make up nearly half the 18 million who live in the province. Xinjiang's ethnic mix reflects its historical importance as a central part of the Silk Road, a trading route used since ancient times to transport good between East and West.

Saving China's golden monkey from extinction -- 10/18/2006
High in the cloud-shrouded Yunling mountains of northwestern Yunnan and southeastern Tibet (southwestern China) lives one of the world's most elusive monkeys, the Yunnan golden or snub-nosed monkey (Rhinopithecus bieti). Despite dwelling the most extreme environment of any monkey species -- high-altitude evergreen forests at elevations from 3000 - 4500 m (9800 - 14,800 feet) where temperatures may fall below freezing for several months in a row -- today there are less than 2000 of Yunnan snub-nosed monkeys remaining. Hunting and habitat loss has brought the species, which is limited to a single mountain range and fragmented into 15 small sub-populations at risk to genetic bottlenecks and inbreeding depression, to the brink of extinction.
Many Americans probably think of China as a land of crowded cities (Shanghai) and expansive agricultural areas. In reality much of China, like the United States, is wilderness, with low population density, magnificent landscapes, and cultural diversity. On my recent trip I visited two regions that fit this description: Xinjiang in far western China, near the border of Tajikistan, Pakistan, and Afghanistan; and northwestern Yunnan, historically and culturally the southeastern-most part of Tibet. These are my pictures,




XINJIANG

Xinjiang, an autonomous province dominated by Muslims, lies in the heart of the ancient Silk Road, a trading route used since ancient times to transport good between East and West. Xinjiang is characterized by rough terrain, with dry deserts accented by some of the highest mountains in the world. Xinjiang is the largest political subdivision of China, accounting for more than one sixth of China's total territory.

Main Sections


People



Scenery


Other Sections

Aerial  |   Agriculture  |   Datong  |   Datong Region  |   Infrastructure  |   Karakoram Highway  |   Kashgar  |   Kashgar Bazaar  |   Kusrap  |   Lake Karakul  |   Lakes  |   Livestock  |   Markets  |   Mosques  |   Mountains  |   Rivers  |   Roads  |   Tashkurgan  |   Temples  |   Villages  |   Yarkand  |   Yurts


20+ Photos

Uighur woman in front of her yurt



Traditional animal-skin yurt



Kusrap man



Uygur boy on horseback at Karakul Lake



Group of Tajiks riding a tractor



Peaks above the Karakoram highway



Sand mountains of Xinjiang



Mountains near a high elevation wetland in Xinjiang



Karakoram highway as it winds through the Pamir mountains



High elevation creek near the Karakoram highway



Turquoise pools along a river in the Kunlun mountains



Peaks surrounding Karakal Lake



Datong village, surrounded by high mountain peaks, partially powered by solar



Village and mountains on road to Datong



Tashkorgan stone city



Lake in Xinjiang



Snow-capped mountains near Bodge Feng peak in western China



Fisheye view of mountains in Xinjiang near the Karakoram highway



Glaciers near Muztaga peak



Mountains near Muzagata Peak









YUNNAN

Yunnan, the southwestern-most province of China, has the highest biodiversity in the country. Yunnan is drained by six major river systems -- including the Yangtze, Pearl, Mekong, Red (Yuan), Salween, and Irrawaddy -- and ranges in elevation from 76 m (250 feet) to the 6,740-meter (21,905-foot) high Kawagebo Peak. Yunnan is also home to 25 of China's ethnic minorities.

Main Sections


People



Scenery


Other Sections

Aerial  |   Agriculture  |   Buddhism  |   Flora  |   Markets  |   Mekong  |   Mountains  |   Pasture  |   Pingan  |   Rice  |   Ringa Monastery  |   Rivers  |   Shangri-La  |   Sumtsanlang Monastery  |   Temples  |   Villages  |   Yangtze


15 Photos

Tibetan woman with a pink headscarf



Man in a rice field



The muddy upper Yangtze in northwestern Yunnan as seen from above



Tibetan woman in the Deqin market



Red grassland



Flooded grassland in Yunnan



Terraced rice fields in NW Yunnan



Deep brick red color of the upper Mekong. This section will be flooded by a dam



Mekong in the mountains of southeastern Tibet / northwestern Yunnan



Rice fields in a valley in Tibetan Yunnan



Giant prayer wheel in Zhongdian



Terraced rice paddies in Yunnan



Tibetan cowboy



Vegetables at the market in Deqin



Tibetan woman leading a cow across a pasture









SHANGHAI

Shanghai is one of the world's largest cities with a population of around 11 million people (the urban area population is closer to 16 million).

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Shanghai



Shanghai Aquarium






Recent news on China:



'Sea change' in clothing industry means more protections for forests

(06/30/2015) Sateri has become the latest major viscose producer to adopt a new wood- and pulp-sourcing policy aimed at removing deforestation from its supply chain. The company, the world's third-largest viscose producer, joins Aditya Birla and Lenzing, the two biggest, in making commitments to stop buying wood pulp from natural or endangered forests.


Chinese turtle heist sends rare Philippine species to brink of extinction, international rescue underway

(06/29/2015) On Friday, June 19, Philippine authorities raided a warehouse on the island of Palawan and confiscated more than 4,000 live, illegally harvested rare turtles, only days before they were to be shipped to foreign food and pet markets. The massive haul included over 3,800 critically endangered Philippine forest turtles – animals in very poor health and showing signs of severe neglect from long captivity.


What do China, Kenya and India have in common? Wildlife trafficking

(06/16/2015) When it comes to trafficking rhino, elephant, and tiger parts the biggest players are China, Kenya, India, Vietnam, South Africa and Thailand, according to a new paper in PNAS. Examining news media reports aggregated by HealthMap: Wildlife Trade, researchers were able to pinpoint the most important countries for exporting, moving and importing illegal wildlife parts worldwide.


'Trying to follow the money': Opacity rules in Southeast Asia's land rush, finds study

(06/15/2015) As the rush for land in Southeast Asia continues at breakneck speed, often bringing with it social and environmental destruction, a new study by a major environmental research group explores how well investors really know where their money is going, and the possibilities and limits of existing data in achieving greater accountability.


Happy tigers: Siberian population continues to grow

(06/09/2015) The Siberian tiger population continues to rebound, according to the latest numbers from the subspecies' stronghold in Russia. Ten years ago, conservationists estimated 423-502 Amur tigers in Siberia. But last month, the Russian government and WWF said numbers had risen to 480-540 tigers, including an estimated 100 cubs.


Passenger pigeon redo? Superabundant bird collapses across Eurasia

(06/08/2015) In 1914 the world's last passenger pigeon died. Nicknamed, Martha, she was not killed by hunters, but simply old age. With her passing, the passenger pigeon fell into extinction. A hundred years before Martha's death, however, the passenger pigeon may have been the most populous bird in the world with a population often estimated in the billions. Now, conservationists warn history may be repeating itself.


Amid rhinoceros poaching frenzy, dark days for South African society

(06/05/2015) South Africa is in the eye of a global rhino-poaching cyclone, with highly organized and elusive international syndicates running a brisk black-market trade in rhino horn. Public trust is faltering: 'Rhino money buys many people at all levels,' a senior antipoaching official said.


Elephants rejoice: China to end ivory trade

(05/29/2015) The Chinese government announced today that it will 'eventually' shut down its legal domestic ivory market. The move, which surprised conservationists, could provide a major boost in efforts to stop the mass killing of elephants for their ivory.


Vaquita porpoises down to 'way less than 100,' Mexican agents shoot fisherman while enforcing new protected area

(05/29/2015) With fewer than 100 individuals alive and dropping fast, the vaquita porpoise is just a swish of the tail away from extinction. In April, alerted by scientists that the vaquita population had recently suffered its biggest decline ever, the Mexican government announced an emergency two-year ban on gillnet fishing across the porpoise's main habitat in the upper Gulf of California. A frenzied race to fish for another critically endangered species, the totoaba, is behind the plummeting porpoise numbers.


China unveils plans for huge railway in South America

(05/27/2015) China is looking to add another rung to its investment presence in Latin America, with an announcement of plans to build an expansive railway bisecting the continent from Brazil to Peru. The bid has raised the hackles of conservation groups, which are concerned the railway will run through sensitive ecosystems, harm threatened wildlife, and affect indigenous communities.


China defends trans-Amazon railway, says it will protect the environment

(05/27/2015) Chinese Premier Li Keqiang has defended a plan to build a railway across the South American continent as a way to protect the environment and grow the region's economy, reports AFP.


China’s investment in Latin America taking toll on the environment, setting the stage for conflict

(05/18/2015) China has been investing heavily in Latin America’s natural resources and crude oil. Recently, the country even pledged to invest $250 billion over the next decade to strengthen its presence in the region, and compete with the U.S. But this increasing Chinese trade and investment in Latin America is also increasing environmental and social conflict, finds a new report published by Boston University.


Five tons of frozen pangolin: Indonesian authorities make massive bust

(04/28/2015) Five tons of frozen pangolin, 77 kilograms (169 pounds) of pangolin scales, and 96 live pangolins: that's the grisly haul of the latest pangolin bust in Indonesia. Officials confiscated the illegal wildlife goods in Medan, Sumatra and busted the smuggler, who has only been identified as SHB. This is the largest pangolin bust in Indonesia since 2008.


Growing need for deforestation-free rubber as tire demand destroys native forests

(04/18/2015) Surging demand for natural rubber is decimating some of the world's most endangered forests, putting wildlife and critical ecosystem services at risk, warn scientists writing in the journal Conservation Letters. Reviewing a large body of published research, Eleanor Warren-Thomas of the University of East Anglia and colleagues detail the crop's expansion across across Southeast Asia in recent decades.


Photo Essay: Geopolitical pawns, the fishermen of Lý Sơn, Vietnam

(04/17/2015) 'When they came, what could we do?' 46-year-old fisherman Nguyên Phú asks, crouching down like a frog with his hands above his head. 'We just put our hands up like this, and said, 'Don't shoot! Don't shoot!'' Their caution is warranted. If they venture too deeply into Vietnam's claimed territorial waters, a Chinese patrol boat will swoop down on them.


Scientists find new monkey with unique penis

(04/10/2015) Researchers were in for a surprise when they viewed footage from a remote and little-explored area of southeastern Tibet. Among the more than 700 photos of macaques, they spotted several with physical characteristics that hadn't been documented before; namely, genitals that were shaped and colored differently than other known macaques in the region. The scientists say these differences may make these macaques a new species.


Could inland aquaculture help save the oceans and feed the world?

(04/02/2015) Mark Kwok has always loved the ocean. An avid diver and spear fisherman, he has travelled the planet in search of exotic fish and undersea adventure. Born into a wealthy Hong Kong family, he had the freedom to explore the world’s oceans. But in the last decade or so, he hasn’t been content just looking at fish. He’s been growing them. In a squat, unassuming cluster of buildings in an industrial suburb north of Hong Kong, Kwok is experimenting with a potentially revolutionary technology.


Pollution from East Asia affecting air quality in Borneo's rainforests

(04/01/2015) A study published in the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics finds that industrial activities in East Asia are polluting the air in the rainforests of Borneo and that, once there, the pollutants could be traveling into the upper atmosphere and impacting Earth’s ozone layer.


Chinese-backed smelter plan causes concern among Sulawesi fishermen

(03/31/2015) As a pair of Chinese-owned miners companies proceed with plans to construct nickel smelters in Indonesia's Central Sulawesi province, in line with a national edict to increase in-country mineral processing capacity, locals fear the factories will only intensify environmental degradation from the same firms' mining operations and harm fishing communities that rely on the area.


Low crop prices means time is ripe for new forest protection programs

(03/27/2015) Today, conservation compliance is a U.S. policy between governments and farmers that reward farmers with federal subsidies for good conservation practices on designated vulnerable lands. But economist Clayton Ogg believes it could now be used to save forests in countries like Brazil, China, India, and Indonesia. "The main drivers for deforestation in recent years are high crop prices. However, as crop prices fall to more normal levels, farmers depend very heavily on government subsidies, and the subsidies become the major driver for deforestation," Ogg told mongabay.com.


Elephant poaching rate unchanged – and still devastating

(03/25/2015) New figures show essentially no change in the number of elephants killed in Africa by poachers last year, despite a high-profile meeting on the crisis which was attended by 46 countries and a number of commitments. Data from CITES' Monitoring the Illegal Killing of Elephants (MIKE) estimated that around 20,000 elephants were killed in 2014, the same as in 2013.


Can voluntary sustainability standards survive in emerging markets?

(03/17/2015) Last month, Price Waterhouse Coopers (PwC) published a new edition of its The World in 2050 report. Confirming the findings of previous studies, the report describes a shift in economic power from the global north to the south. PwC projects that the US' and EU's share of world GDP will face a steady decline from around 33 percent in 2014 to about 25 percent by 2050. At the same time, emerging markets like China, India, Brazil, Russia, Indonesia, Mexico, and Turkey (the so-called E7 countries) are gaining in importance as both producers and consumers in the global economy.


Endangered forests shrink as demand for soy rises

(03/10/2015) As battles over labeling genetically modified foods or displaying calorific breakdowns per serving rage on, it appears that a possibly more significant battle is in its infancy - where do all the ingredients on the package actually come from?


Giant panda population rises by nearly 17 percent

(03/02/2015) One of the most iconic animals on the planet got good news this week. The world's giant panda population has risen by 268 individuals over the last decade, hitting a total of 1,864 animals, according to China's fourth decadal survey. This represents a total rise of 16.8 percent.


China bans carved ivory imports

(02/26/2015) China has established a one-year ban on imports of carved African elephant ivory.


Photos: Amur leopard population hits at least 65

(02/26/2015) Most of the world's big predators are in decline, but there are some happy stories out there. This week, WWF announced that the Amur leopard population has grown to a total of 65-69 cats. This represents a more than doubling of the population in eight years. Still, the Critically Endangered subspecies remains perilously close to extinction.


China tries out logging ban in northeastern province

(01/28/2015) China's Heilongjiang province, which borders Russia to its north and east, contains 18.5 million hectares of state forest - more natural forest than any other province in the country. However, since the mid-twentieth century, Heilongjiang has had over 600 million cubic meters of timber extracted from its woodlands. Now, China is trying out a complete ban on commercial logging in the province's state-owned forests.


China’s recent forest tenure reforms threaten panda habitat

(01/27/2015) Since the 1950s, plantations and second-growth forests in China have been locally managed by village communities as collective forests, which today account for 58 percent of China's forestland. Many of these collective forests lie within mountainous rural areas, some of which are also home to the 1,600 or so wild giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) that survive today.


Top 10 HAPPY environmental stories of 2014

(12/29/2014) In what was widely seen as a possible breakthrough in the battle to coordinate some kind of response to global warming, China and the U.S. announced joint actions this year. On November 12th, the world's two most powerful countries surprised pretty much everyone by announcing that they would work together to tackle the crisis.


Top 10 Environmental Stories of 2014

(12/23/2014) In 2014, the unimaginable happened: companies representing the majority of palm oil production and trade agreed to stop cutting down rainforests and draining peatlands for new oil palm plantations. After years of intense campaigning by environmentalists and dire warnings from scientists, nearly two dozen major producers, traders, and buyers established zero deforestation policies.





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